Other iconic phones that deserve to be resurrected

Shouldn’t these phones from our memories get a chance at a new life too?

Iconic phones that deserve to be resurrected
11 Mar 2017

Iconic phones that deserve to be resurrected

The Mobile World Congress is supposed to be about the next big thing in mobile tech, yet a basic feature phone like the all new Nokia 3310 stole the show.

In that case, may we suggest that these classic phones that we grew up with get a new shot at life? Brace yourself, we're about to get sentimental.

Motorola Startac (1996)
11 Mar 2017

Motorola Startac (1996)

The Startac holds the title of first flip phone ever invented and its name is geeky on purpose, as a tribute to Star Trek’s Communicator. If you’re wondering why it looks so familiar, that’s because the Razr is considered as its successor. It was also one of the first phones to have vibration as an alternative alert, how revolutionary.

Image: Gizmodo

Nokia 8810 (1998)
11 Mar 2017

Nokia 8810 (1998)

Believe it or not, this was Nokia’s flagship at that time. While other phones were still wearing their antennas on the outside, the Nokia 8810 was the first to pack it on the inside. Metal might be considered an ordinary outfit for smartphones of today, but back in the 8810’s time, its cool chrome coating was thought of as fashion-forward and completely high-end.

Panasonic GD92 (2000)
11 Mar 2017

Panasonic GD92 (2000)

Oh look, how quaint. A phone with an antenna. Although not as successful as the Nokia or the Motorola back in the day, Panasonic managed to win a place in people’s hearts with the endearing 77g GD92. Don’t knock its plain form, its LCD display could light up in four different colours, no small feat for a phone of its time.

Nokia 7600 (2003)
11 Mar 2017

Nokia 7600 (2003)

Once a phone is targeted at the fashion crowd, you can expect it to come with a fatal flaw. And in this case, it was that unique keypad which required everyone to mentally recalibrate their SMSing styles. But hey, you’d be able to recognise that teardrop form anywhere and it was incredibly portable for its time, though a lot less functional as well.

Ericsson T28 (1999)
11 Mar 2017

Ericsson T28 (1999)

Considered a classic by many, the T28 was one of the greatest phones ever produced by Ericsson before it joined forces with Sony in 2001. It might not look it with its tiny screen, but it’s positioned as a premium phone. A couple of its accolades include being the first phone to use lithium polymer batteries and having an automatically opening flip.

Samsung SGH-E700 (2003)
11 Mar 2017

Samsung SGH-E700 (2003)

This feature phone might be pretty bare bones with no standout gimmick to help it leave its mark upon the mobile world, but it’s still clearly etched into many a user’s memory. It had the basic fixings like polyphonic ringtones and a VGA camera which aren’t remarkable by today’s standards. Except for one spec - the 780mAh battery that gave it up to 230 hours of standby time. You win some, you lose some.

Motorola V70 (2002)
11 Mar 2017

Motorola V70 (2002)

The V70 had a design that you could spin (me) right round (baby, right round). The keypad cover rotated 360 degrees (like Linda Blair’s head in the Exorcist) for innovation’s sake. Due to its compact size which enabled it to be worn around the user’s neck if he so pleased, the keys were criticised for being too small to actually be all that functional.

Source: PhoneArena

Siemens SL45 (2001)
11 Mar 2017

Siemens SL45 (2001)

While the Siemens SL45 might look like any other phone on the outside, it’s what’s on the inside that counts. It’s the first phone to come with memory expansion and an MP3 player, which means this is the phone that your smartphones have to thank for the same tech. And it also fit all that cutting edge tech (stopwatch, currency converter, and games) into its tiny form. Amazing.

Nokia N-Gage (2003)
10 Mar 2017

Nokia N-Gage (2003)

One of the most memorable hybrids in the tech world, the N-Gage predicted that gaming would be big on mobile phones way before it actually happened. In its desire to be a Jack of two trades, it only succeeded in being a master of none. As such, it failed to engage the world, but its design lives on in many people’s minds.

Nokia 9000 (1996)
10 Mar 2017

Nokia 9000 (1996)

The first in Nokia’s Communicator series, the Nokia 9000 was considered a mobile powerhouse for its time. Packing a 24MHz Intel processor, 8 MB of memory, and a grayscale display, it was considered revolutionary back in the day. It looked like a typical phone, but open it up and you get the future - a full QWERTY keypad and internet connectivity (with a dedicated button). Amazing.

Motorola Razr (2004)
10 Mar 2017

Motorola Razr (2004)

Hello, Moto. Back when thin was still a thing, the Razr exploded onto the scene and became the de facto it phone of the moment. For a clamshell, it had the slightest silhouette for its time at just 13.9mm. Initially positioned as a fashion phone, Motorola also teamed up with Dolce and Gabbana for a limited edition gold run. At least they foresaw one of today's trends - gold.

Nokia 8250 (1999)
10 Mar 2017

Nokia 8250 (1999)

During its heyday, the Nokia 8250 was the most compact phone of its time weighing in at just 79g. It fit perfectly into most school uniform pockets and couldn’t be detected by discipline masters on the prowl. What’s most memorable however is probably that blue backlight glowing under tables as your classmates furtively text one another under the table.

Nokia 5110 (1998)
10 Mar 2017

Nokia 5110 (1998)

What’s so special about this phone, you ask? Plenty. It was one of the first to feature swappable faceplates - everyone’s only option to customise the way their phones looked back then. But more importantly, it was one of the first phones to feature everyone’s favourite time-killer - Snake.

BlackBerry Bold 9000 (2008)
10 Mar 2017

BlackBerry Bold 9000 (2008)

It might be difficult for you to remember when BlackBerry ruled the mobile scene, but truth be told, it wasn’t all that long ago when everyone - from the coolest kid in the club to the suits in the CBD - seemed to be using a BB. That trackball and QWERTY keyboard were what people used to BBM one another. And it was cool back then. Now? It’s tragic how quickly the BlackBerry name has become synonymous with irrelevance.

Nokia 8110 (1996)
10 Mar 2017

Nokia 8110 (1996)

If being featured in The Matrix doesn’t give you instant futuristic credibility, we don’t know what will. This phone was designed with the business crowd in mind and the first of Nokia’s premium 8000 line. But what made it really stick out was the way it was curved when the number pad was revealed. All this even before the curve was cool. Talk about forward thinking.

Samsung S300 (2003)
10 Mar 2017

Samsung S300 (2003)

This classic clamshell was a fan favourite. Small in size, but big in impact thanks to its dual coloured screens. Back in 2003, its 256 colour external screen (outside caller ID basically) and polyphonic ringtones were considered the future. Don’t snigger. One day, we’ll all look back on the Galaxy S6 and laugh at how prehistoric it looks, too.

Nokia 3210 (1999)
10 Mar 2017

Nokia 3210 (1999)

You might not know it, but the Nokia 3210 was one of the first mainstream phones to come with an internal antenna, doing away with the awkward bump at the top. Thanks to its trio of pre-installed games (yes, including Snake) and customisable ringtones and covers, the Nokia 3210 was a big hit with the younger folks.

LG Chocolate (2006)
10 Mar 2017

LG Chocolate (2006)

Positioned as a premium handset, the LG Chocolate won widespread acclaim for its understated design. Depending on where you lived in the world, the LG Chocolate took on different forms (we loved the slider one) and colours (including a questionable pink). But what remained consistent were its sleek lines and red hot accents. Later iterations also included a slabby one that was not unlike the screen-dominated smartphones of today.

Sony Ericsson W800 (2005)
10 Mar 2017

Sony Ericsson W800 (2005)

Before the Sony Xperia series of today, there was the W line. The W800 was the first of this Walkman-branded series of music phones and supported a massive 2GB of external memory for storing all the shots you took with its 2MP camera. The music pedigree meant that it played MP3 and AAC files, a very important thing in the past before music streaming services started sprouting up in every corner of the internet.

This story first appeared on Stuff.

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