8 amazingly inspiring Para Games moments

After a nail-biting two days of competitions, we look at some heart-stirring moments at the 8th ASEAN Para Games

8 amazingly inspiring Para Games moments
8 amazingly inspiring Para Games moments
05 Dec 2015

8 amazingly inspiring Para Games moments

The 8th ASEAN Para Games kicked off at the National Indoor Stadium on June 3 in Singapore. As the Games progress, we take a look at some amazingly heartwarming moments so far.

Read on for more.

1. When former street child and double amputee won gold
1. When former street child and double amputee won gold
05 Dec 2015

1. When former street child and double amputee won gold

Photo: Calvin Teoh/ Sport Singapore

Having lost both his arms during a train accident in Myanmar some ten years ago, Aung Nyein Oo is a testimony to the saying: “your background and situation doesn’t determine your future”. A former street child who spent his days wandering around the central train station in the country’s second largest city Mandalay, Aung’s perserverance to go against all odds paid off once again when he won gold in the men's 100m breaststroke on Friday (Dec 4) at the ASEAN Para Games (APG) with a record breaking timing of 1:32.83. Watch his winning moment here.

The 24-year-old swimmer first won two gold medals at the 2011 Games in Solo and another two in the 2013 Games in Myanmar.


2. When Paralympic champ made history (again, despite the challenge)
2. When Paralympic champ made history (again, despite the challenge)
05 Dec 2015

2. When Paralympic champ made history (again, despite the challenge)

Photo: Sport Singapore / Action Images via Reuters

Swimmer Yip Pin Xiu (pictured left) first made Singapore sports history in 2008 when she became the first Singaporean to win a gold medal at the Paralympic Games. The 23-year-old did it again on Friday, snagging the country’s first silver medal with a timing of 2:11:86 in the 100m freestyle, despite having to compete three classes up due to lack of swimmers in her usual S2 category. A lower number indicates more severe activity limitation, meaning Pin Xiu competed with more able-bodied swimmers.

Diagnosed with hereditary sensory-motor neuropathy (muscular dystrophy) since three, the talented girl has not let her disability stop her from her dreams and making an impact on society. The Singapore Management University student was named Sportsgirl of the Year by Singapore Disability Sports Council for three years in a row, from 2006 to 2008, and was awarded the Public Service Medal in 2008. Now, that’s amazing accolades we could never dream of having while still a student.


3. When athletes achieve their dreams and more
3. When athletes achieve their dreams and more
05 Dec 2015

3. When athletes achieve their dreams and more

Photo: Sport Singapore / Action Images via Reuters

It was his dream to win an SG50 gold medal at the APG and on Saturday, Singapore para-paddler Jason Chee delivered on his promise. The Navy Serviceman, who lost his legs and left arm in a ship accident in 2012, won all three of his matches to lead the men's team to a 3-1 victory over Thailand and Singapore’s first table tennis gold.

Calling the feat “the biggest achievement of my sports career”, the 32-year-old said in an interview after winning: “I started to play table tennis on a wheelchair in June 2013 and wanted to get a gold medal for my life. It was not an easy fight but I achieved that today. It feels awesome."



4. When doing one’s best means bearing with the pain, quite literally
4. When doing one’s best means bearing with the pain, quite literally
05 Dec 2015

4. When doing one’s best means bearing with the pain, quite literally

Photo: Seow Gim Hong / Sport Singapore

Malaysian swimmer Yeoh Yi Lin displayed great determination to compete despite feeling a great deal of discomfort at the starting blocks before the 400m freestyle final on Saturday.

The 21-year-old was initially hesitant to step up on the swimming block, and her coach was even seen giving a no-go to officials. Yet, spectators in the arena patiently waited with bated breath until she finally took the plunge. Though eventually coming in last, Yi Lin’s extraordinary courage and determination are what’s inspiring indeed.


 

5. When everyone played fair
5. When everyone played fair
05 Dec 2015

5. When everyone played fair

Photo: Andrew JK Tan/ Sport Singapore

Thai athlete Wannaruemon Kewalin is pictured here celebrating her new Games record and win at the women’s 100m finals with her guide and competitors.

In order to equalise varying level of visual impairment and ensure fairness for para athletes, special measures such as wearing eyeshades and competing with the help of a guide are allowed at the Games.

 

6. When age is but a number
6. When age is but a number
05 Dec 2015

6. When age is but a number

Photo: Sport Singapore / Action Images via Reuters

Tenpin bowler Thomas Yong might be 61 years old and visually impaired, but he lets neither disability nor age get in the way of his dreams. The former army officer told TODAY that he wants to bowl for another five to ten years.

“Age should not deter people from playing sports. Sport is a lifestyle. If a person makes it a point to exercise every day, he can stay healthy for as long as possible,” he said.

Thomas has so far helped Singapore clinch a bronze medal at the 1st Asian Para Games held in Guangzhou in 2010, a gold and silver medal at the 6th ASEASN Para Games in Solo and a newly minted bronze yesterday (Dec 5) in a mixed doubled match along with team mate Mohamed Ismail.



7. When there were unabashed support from fans
7. When there were unabashed support from fans
05 Dec 2015

7. When there were unabashed support from fans

Photo: ONS Sports Hub Cluster FB photo/ By Wilson Wong

Probably one of the most “outstanding” cheerleaders at the Games, Thailand supporter Bancha Khamthong (pictured left) wasn't afraid to make his love known, appearing at the stands in traditional Thai costume complete with Thai flag and colours that drew much attention from the crowds and media alike.

A familiar figure at various sporting events, Bancha Khamthong, who goes by the nickname Dakdae, has been cheering on the Thai contingent for more than two decades, following them to different tournaments all over the world. For his unwavering support all these years, we think he deseves a medal.

Speaking of passionate fans...

 

8. When flowers were given to male athletes
8. When flowers were given to male athletes
05 Dec 2015

8. When flowers were given to male athletes

Photo: ASEAN Para Games 2015 FB video/ By Guowei Xie

Awww, how sweet! We couldn’t help but gush when female fans of Myanmar’s cerebral palsy football team handed out flowers to the athletes after they emerged triumphant against Singapore with a score of 5-3. Whoever said receiving flowers is a woman’s prerogative ought to think again.


 

Watch daily highlights of the ASEAN Para Games on our microsite!

Related: 
ASEAN Para Games opens celebrating the extraordinary spirit

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