Fancy A Cup Of Bulletproof Coffee?

Find out where that and other weird brews exist around the world

Bulletproof coffee
Bulletproof coffee
11 Sep 2015

Bulletproof coffee


Touted to taste like a creamy latte, it’s the inspired creation of American computer engineer David Asprey after he tasted yak-butter tea during his trip to Tibet. The ingredients include low-toxin coffee, unsalted grass-fed butter and triglyceride oil. Asprey also insists his coffee has boosted his IQ by over 20 points. 

Kopi joss
Kopi joss
11 Sep 2015

Kopi joss

An Indonesian creation, it’s basically regular-brewed cup of coffee with a flaming-hot piece of charcoal added to neutralise the coffee’s acidity. Strange, but it exists. What we don’t get is – doesn’t the glass melt?

Coffee with peppercorns
Coffee with peppercorns
11 Sep 2015

Coffee with peppercorns

When in Morocco, expect your coffee to be sprinkled with black peppercorns. Not quite music to your ears? Other options include coffee with spices ranging from cinnamon to cardamom to cloves.

Soy coffee
Soy coffee
11 Sep 2015

Soy coffee

Caffeine-free and rich in proteins, this variant was created for consumers who are gluten-intolerant. Available from soycoffee.com, it also comes in flavours such as hazelnut and chai. Not surprisingly, it’s popular among Atkins dieters.

Coffee with salt
Coffee with salt
11 Sep 2015

Coffee with salt

This drink has nothing to do with a practical joke, we assure you. Not many know this, but it’s common practice to add in a pinch of salt to coffee especially in regions such as Northern Scandinavia, Siberia, Turkey, Hungary, Ethiopia and Eritrea. Rather than turn your coffee savoury, it cuts down on the coffee’s bitterness and enhances its flavour. Much like adding salt to chocolate.

Coffee with cheese
Coffee with cheese
11 Sep 2015

Coffee with cheese

We can’t say this drink sounds appetising in any way. Coffee is brewed regularly, then served with a hunk of semi-hard cheese in it. This cheese is eaten afterwards, when it’s soft. There are even different variations of this; the Hispanics have Guarapo con Queso featuring Gouda or Edam cheese while the Swedes have Kaffeost using a Finnish cheese called Leipäjuusto.

Kopi luwak (civet coffee)
Kopi luwak (civet coffee)
11 Sep 2015

Kopi luwak (civet coffee)

Those with iron stomachs may want to try this other Indonesian creation, said to be the world’s most expensive coffee. It’s essentially a brew made from processed luwak’s (palm civet cat) droppings, which contain undigested coffee beans from the coffee cherries these critters love to eat.  Some question if the flavour is worth the exorbitant price. We say there’s only one way to find out.

Coffee with butter
Coffee with butter
11 Sep 2015

Coffee with butter

Putting butter in hot coffee isn’t new to Singapore – and neither is it a fad. Not only does butter give coffee a nice aroma, it also creates a richer flavour and a thicker consistency. Head to your nearest kopi-tiam where uncles happily serve this, because you’re not likely to find it at food courts or hawker centres.

Coffee with egg
Coffee with egg
11 Sep 2015

Coffee with egg

Picture this: A whole egg, including its shell, mixed with ground coffee before it is brewed the regular way, then filtered to create a thick, non-bitter, non-acidic egg coffee. This Scandinavian concoction is said to yield an amber-gold beverage, which does not smell as good as it looks. There’s also a Vietnamese version of eggy coffee called cà phê trứng, made by whisking egg yolk, sweetened condensed milk and freshly-brewed Vietnamese coffee.  

Citrus coffee
Citrus coffee
11 Sep 2015

Citrus coffee

Given lemon tea is such a popular drink, it was only a matter of time before citrus fruit made their way into coffee. In Sao Paulo, Brazilians drink café com limão (espresso with lime) while Italians love their espresso with lemon peel or juice.  

 



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