5 tips to help you feel better in life

Certain everyday habits have a negative impact on your life without you realising it. Time to get rid of them.

PHOTOS: ING Image
PHOTOS: ING Image
08 Sep 2015

PHOTOS: ING Image

Stop trying to be perfect

Take pride in your work and do the best you can, but don’t let it consume you. Set impossibly high standards and you’ll never achieve them nor appreciate the end result; it’ll only leave you in a constant state of frustration and stress. This also goes for demanding the same high standards of others.

Realistic targets reap far better rewards in terms of fulfillment and wellbeing. If you aim to do 10 units of something and do it, then that’s good. If you manage 12, give yourself a pat on the back. Working longer hours or striving for something that’ll never enrich your life will, instead, cause a detrimental effect to your mind frame. Drop that unrealistic goal like a hot brick and feel the weight lift off your shoulders.

Chuck office clutter
Chuck office clutter
08 Sep 2015

Chuck office clutter

Piles of documents are stacked precariously like Jenga on your desk; receipts and invoices are littered all over the work tray; the plant looks a bit brown and needs watering; the used coffee mug has been unused - and unwashed - for 8 days. But it's okay, you’ll get to them soon…

There’s no such thing as organised mess. If your desk is cluttered, your inability to focus at the matter in hand limits your brain’s ability to process information and work at its optimum. When things are neat, tidy and in order, your mood improves, too. In turn, you feel more relaxed.

Take it easy on kopi
Take it easy on kopi
08 Sep 2015

Take it easy on kopi

Coffee’s not bad - it gives you that little extra boost to kick start the day. But have it near bedtime and you’re setting yourself up for failure. Caffeine can and will disrupt your sleep cycle if it becomes too involved in your life. It blocks adenosine, a by-product of active cells that makes you want to sleep as it accumulates in the body.

A study published by the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine showed that by drinking coffee 6 hours before going to bed adversely affects the quality of your sleep. So, ideally, drink coffee only in the morning.

Don't say you not thirsty
Don't say you not thirsty
08 Sep 2015

Don't say you not thirsty

As little as 2% of normal fluid loss can affect your daily performance - dehydration causes you to to suffer a reduction in blood volume. This makes the blood thicker and, as such, your heart has to pump harder than it otherwise needs to. This reduces the speed at which oxygen and nutrients reach your muscles and organs. If your body is under undue stress, it’ll manifest in other ways, such as headaches. Drinking water regularly throughout the day can fend off all of this.

As a rule of thumb: Take your weight in pounds, halve that figure and drink that amount in ounces each day. But, obviously, adjust based on your activity level. If you’re highly active, bump the amount up.

Skip nightcap
Skip nightcap
08 Sep 2015

Skip nightcap

Aren’t we all guilty of this sometimes… Sneaking a drink before bedtime thinking it’ll relax us. But having a tipple in the evening can easily be a bane instead of a boon.

Alcohol depresses the central nervous system in its initial stages, which produces a sedative effect. But in the long run, it drastically affects sleep patterns and maintenance. What it also does is create a “bounce back” effect, as it metabolises and produces a sudden surge in adrenaline. Hence, you’re likely to be woken easily during the night, have trouble getting back to sleep and have a lousy morning due to lack of sleep.

How to combat this? Avoid alcohol at least three hours before going to bed.

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5 reasons why you don’t feel fit despite training nonstop
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