7 myths about sweat you need to stop believing

Separate the truth from fiction about one of men’s most stained health issues.

The more you sweat, the better the workout, the more fat you lose
The more you sweat, the better the workout, the more fat you lose
29 Dec 2015

The more you sweat, the better the workout, the more fat you lose

Not true. The amount of sweat burnt is not indicative of the amount of calories burnt. Sweat consists of water, salts and trace amounts of other minerals. The amount of fat in sweat is insignificant so an increase in sweating does not mean you are losing fat. Moreover, weight loss experienced immediately after a workout is only water; which you’ll gain back right after rehydrating yourself. The length and intensity of your workout matters more. So if you go for a 30min run and don’t sweat a drop, you still burn almost 300 calories.

Putting powder under the armpits will stop the sweat
Putting powder under the armpits will stop the sweat
29 Dec 2015

Putting powder under the armpits will stop the sweat

Not true. Talcum powder is the finely milled version of talc, a soft tanglin mamineral made of magnesium silicate. It's an astringent, which means that it causes body tissues to constrict and creates a dry surface. Baby powder can absorb sweat and keep down sweat production only in areas where there's skin-on-skin contact, but will not stop sweat production.

Underarms have the most sweat glands
Underarms have the most sweat glands
29 Dec 2015

Underarms have the most sweat glands

Not true. The highest density of sweat glands can be found on the soles of the feet, and they can produce a pint of sweat per day. The back, on the other hand, has the least amount of sweat glands. In fact, only one per cent of all sweat moisture comes from the armpits. But because it has minimal ventilation, the sweat here evaporates slower than on other parts of the body.

Sweat causes body odour
Sweat causes body odour
29 Dec 2015

Sweat causes body odour

Half true. But this is not due to sweat alone. Sweat itself is virtually odourless to humans. Body odour occurs when bacteria, present in the sweat on our skin, multiplies and breaks down the sweat into acids that eventually causes the unpleasant smell.

The less water you drink, the less likely it is to sweat
The less water you drink, the less likely it is to sweat
29 Dec 2015

The less water you drink, the less likely it is to sweat

Not true. No matter how much water you drink, you’d still sweat the same amount. In fact, drinking less water would put an individual who sweats a lot at a risk of dehydration.

Only overweight people who are out of shape suffer from excessive sweating
Only overweight people who are out of shape suffer from excessive sweating
29 Dec 2015

Only overweight people who are out of shape suffer from excessive sweating

Not true. They are merely more prone to excessive sweating because the additional fat layers act as an insulator, leading to a rapid rise in the core body temperature, making them hotter and needing to sweat to regulate body temperature. People who are not fit may also sweat more easily as they tire out faster. Heavy sweating can affect anyone no matter their weight. Other conditions such as genetic predisposition and excessive thyroid activity may also cause excessive sweating.

Anti-perspirants can cause cancer as it blocks some sweat glands
Anti-perspirants can cause cancer as it blocks some sweat glands
29 Dec 2015

Anti-perspirants can cause cancer as it blocks some sweat glands

Not true. The concern is that parabens and aluminium, an active ingredient in many antiperspirants, can cause breast cancer. Parabens have oestrogen-like properties, and because oestrogen can promote the growth of breast-cancer tissue, some researchers are concerned that parabens may have the same effect when absorbed through the skin. However, the evidence is inconclusive, and new studies show that paraben traces are present in the tissue of almost all breast cancer patients, whether or not they use antiperspirants. Moreover, parabens are rarely used in deodorants and antiperspirants, and are the most widely used preservatives in the cosmetics industry.

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