5 Successful Rules of Running (Part 1)

There’s more to effective running than just putting on a good pair of running shoes. The coaches from Spartan Race show you how to ace your runs.

Warm up, cool down
Warm up, cool down
09 Oct 2015

Warm up, cool down

PHOTOS: Spartan Race, Inc and ING Photos

A gentle 5- to 10-minute warm up before a run loosens you up and gets the heart pumping. It also gets your breathing going and sends blood to the muscles where it’s needed. A loose rule of thumb: The further your run, the longer your warm-up should be. Cooling down is just as beneficial. If you stop dead immediately after an 8km run, there’s a chance blood will pool in your legs and you’ll feel faint. Finish the distance, slow down to a walk, then come to a rest gradually.

Keep it slow and steady
Keep it slow and steady
09 Oct 2015

Keep it slow and steady

You’ll reap better benefits if you go slowly and steady in terms of adding mileage to your distance covered. Adding 10% each week to your run is a good rule of thumb. Remember that your body has to adapt to what you are putting it through. The same principle applies in the gym.

Leave some in the tank
Leave some in the tank
09 Oct 2015

Leave some in the tank

Eight out of every 10 runs you do should be run at around a minute or so slower than your goal race time. If you’re breathing heavily, you’re going too fast. Your lungs and heart will adapt a lot quicker than your muscles, tendons and bones, as you up the length of your runs. Regular running at an easy pace gives your musculoskeletal system a chance to consolidate and catch up with any cardiovascular improvements you are making.

Run to the hills
Run to the hills
09 Oct 2015

Run to the hills

Hills are the best tool to build muscle memory, strength, aerobic capacity and running economy. At least once a week, find the hilliest route and use it to build and build. The strength and stamina you develop on hills and inclines will serve to make you faster and stronger.

Take a break
Take a break
09 Oct 2015

Take a break

Resting is just as important as training. While it’s true that pushing yourself allows you to develop and become stronger, doing it without rest will result in injury or burning out — undoing the good work you’ve done. Once every few weeks, cut back your distances by 20%. On some days, just rest entirely. Your body uses this time to rebuild torn muscles and become stronger. This helps you to become stronger and less prone to fatigue when going longer distances or running faster.

The Reebok Spartan Race Singapore happens 15 Nov. To register, click here.

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4 simple ways to injury-proof your body
5 obstacle-race myths debunked
How to conquer Spartan Race like a true warrior

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