brought to you by
 
Presented By

Men vs. Women: How differently do they sleep?

Who needs more sleep and who copes better when exhausted? Here’s how gender could and might influence your sleep patterns

He sleeps, she sleeps, everyone sleeps differently
He sleeps, she sleeps, everyone sleeps differently
20 Feb 2017

He sleeps, she sleeps, everyone sleeps differently

Photos: INGimage and King Koil Singapore

Everyone shares the same essential need to sleep well so that we can carry out our daily functions productively and happily. On average, most adults should get between seven and nine hours of quality sleep but in reality, some struggle just to get enough zzz’s. Some of the reasons, according to studies, may be related to gender differences.

So is it true that women need more sleep than men while snoring is more common in men than in women? Or are these just gender stereotype assumptions? Here’s a look at some of the studies on how men and women sleep differently. 

Time spent in bed: Who needs more sleep?
Time spent in bed: Who needs more sleep?
20 Feb 2017

Time spent in bed: Who needs more sleep?

Women apparently! Lest you think this makes women seem like the weaker or lazier gender, stop. According to a recent study, the need for more sleep is linked to women’s mental energy expenditure as “women simply use their brain more than men do” – confirming the long held belief that women really are better at multitasking than their male peers.

In an article published on Medical Daily, Dr Jim Horne, an expert in sleep science at Loughborough University in England, said, “Women tend to multitask…the more of your brain you use during the day, the more of it that needs to recover and, consequently, the more sleep you need.”

But here’s the downside: research, as published on WebMD, also show that when women lose sleep, they face a higher risk of health problems such as heart disease, diabetes and depression. So ladies, listen to your body and do not deprive yourself of that well-deserved snooze!  

Insomnia: Who gets it worse?
Insomnia: Who gets it worse?
20 Feb 2017

Insomnia: Who gets it worse?

Battling with sleepless nights is a common sleep problem that can happen to both men and women but insomnia, in particular, seems to hit more women than men for a few reasons. Based on a poll done by National Sleep Foundation, more women than men have trouble staying asleep, and are likely to “experience symptoms of insomnia at least a few nights a week and daytime sleepiness.”

Why aren’t women sleeping? Hormonal reasons, linked to menstruation and menopause, are the biggest contributors while other factors like anxiety, pregnancy or even a snoring partner could interfere with women getting quality sleep.

A study, reported in WebMD, led by Dr Diane Boivin from McGill University, also found that women’s internal, or circadian, body clocks run at a faster pace than men’s. “It’s as if women operate in different internal time zone and they go to bed at a later biological time because of the shift,” said Dr Boivin. As a result, women are more likely than men to end up with a poor night’s sleep.

If you’ve been having trouble sleeping, try using aromatherapy treatments in your bedroom as essentials oils can help you relax and soothe you into sleep. A conducive bedroom environment can also help you fall asleep faster and sleep better so remember to draw the curtains, reduce the lighting and put away all work-related materials. 

After a poor night’s sleep: Who wakes up happier?
After a poor night’s sleep: Who wakes up happier?
20 Feb 2017

After a poor night’s sleep: Who wakes up happier?

Ok men, you are officially the happier and sweeter morning species – accordingly to research. Thanks (or not) to the affirmation of women being the better multi-tasking gender hence requiring more sleep to recover and different hormonal makeups; females are seemingly more emotionally and physically affected when they wake up in the morning. Worse, when they don’t get enough shuteye.

Studies have shown a sharp difference on how men and women deal with insufficient rest, according to an article published on Medical Daily. Researchers from Duke University found that “women had more depression, anger and hostility early in the morning.”

What gives? Gender differences in hormones and brain activity, says sleep research, Edward Suarez in an ELLE article. The rise of testosterone levels in men actually staves off negative health effects such as hostility and depression after a night of poor sleep. Unfortunately, progesterone, the hormones found in women does not have the same stress-reliving effect.

The prolonged effects of a poor night’s sleep can cause detrimental health problems. Take time to wind down before bedtime and most importantly, invest in a comfortable bed that is tailored to your sleeping needs, or even better, customise the firmness of the mattress according to you and your partner’s comfort preferences.

Try the King Koil Hybrid Mattress Collection (above) that allows couples to combine two different comfort levels (choose from extra firm, medium and soft) into one mattress to suit individual needs and preferences.

Snoring: Who’s the biggest culprit?
Snoring: Who’s the biggest culprit?
20 Feb 2017

Snoring: Who’s the biggest culprit?

Is your husband’s incessant snoring leaving you with chronic sleep deprivation? Or is your sweet, gentle boyfriend suddenly snoring like an asthmatic warthog? And therein lies the answer to the age-old question: Do men snore more than women? Yes!

In a poll conducted by the sleep foundation (via WebMD), middle-aged and older men make up the largest group of chronic snorers, citing “30% of adults over the age of 30 snore – and women make up one-third of those snorers.”

Apart from medical reasons and lifestyle reasons like obesity or alcohol consumption, the reason why men snore more than women may have something to do with their anatomy.

Like other body muscles, our throat muscles relax when we sleep thus causing the soft tissues around the throat area to collapse and vibrate, and this results in a narrow airway that obstructs breathing and causes snoring. The space around the throat is larger in men than women, which may explain the severity of snoring in men

If you’re looking for a bedding product that helps to prevent snoring, try SnoreBeGone (above), a sleep positioning system that is used to reduce the incidence of snoring. Designed to promote an optimal sleeping position, it helps to overcome factors that are associated with snoring, such as sleeping on one’s back and relaxed throat muscles due to aging. 

Report a problem