Hong Kong’s Ghost Towns

Step away from Hong Kong’s densely populated city centre and into the wild surrounds of its abandoned villages

Travel Bravely - Hong Kong
23 Dec 2016

Travel Bravely - Hong Kong

photo credit: Jason Yeo

It seems surreal to imagine that a densely populated city like Hong Kong would leave abandoned buildings and empty towns to crumble, but a large part of the city’s land is actually sparsely inhabited rural territory. For a holiday that is certainly off the beaten track, pack a sense of adventure in your bag and get set to explore some of the city’s most iconic abandoned villages.

Sha Lo Tung, Tai Po
23 Dec 2016

Sha Lo Tung, Tai Po

photo credit: Jason Yeo

Once home to Hakka farmers who have since moved to the city, Sha Lo Tung is by and large uninhabited, with the exception of village chief Cheung Wai-kok and his wife, who run a Hakka private kitchen very popular with weekend hikers. Though neglected and mostly crumbling, the abandoned homes make quite a stunning sight against the village’s backdrop of verdant greens. You see, the Sha Lo Tung wetlands are a protected ecological area, and a visit in spring and summer promises views of lush flora and fauna. The area is also a prime habitat for dragonflies, damselflies and butterflies, and is great for birdwatching — a big plus for nature lovers!

To get here, find your way to Tai Po and take any public transportation that takes you through Ting Kok Road. Alight at Fung Yuen and begin your hike there. There is also a trail at Sha Lo Tung that that leads to the popular Pat Sin Leng Nature Trail.

Sha Lo Tung, Tai Po
23 Dec 2016

Sha Lo Tung, Tai Po

photo credit: Jason Yeo

Once home to Hakka farmers who have since moved to the city, Sha Lo Tung is by and large uninhabited, with the exception of village chief Cheung Wai-kok and his wife, who run a Hakka private kitchen very popular with weekend hikers. Though neglected and mostly crumbling, the abandoned homes make quite a stunning sight against the village’s backdrop of verdant greens. You see, the Sha Lo Tung wetlands are a protected ecological area, and a visit in spring and summer promises views of lush flora and fauna. The area is also a prime habitat for dragonflies, damselflies and butterflies, and is great for birdwatching — a big plus for nature lovers!

To get here, find your way to Tai Po and take any public transportation that takes you through Ting Kok Road. Alight at Fung Yuen and begin your hike there. There is also a trail at Sha Lo Tung that that leads to the popular Pat Sin Leng Nature Trail.

Sha Lo Tung, Tai Po
23 Dec 2016

Sha Lo Tung, Tai Po

photo credit: Jason Yeo

Once home to Hakka farmers who have since moved to the city, Sha Lo Tung is by and large uninhabited, with the exception of village chief Cheung Wai-kok and his wife, who run a Hakka private kitchen very popular with weekend hikers. Though neglected and mostly crumbling, the abandoned homes make quite a stunning sight against the village’s backdrop of verdant greens. You see, the Sha Lo Tung wetlands are a protected ecological area, and a visit in spring and summer promises views of lush flora and fauna. The area is also a prime habitat for dragonflies, damselflies and butterflies, and is great for birdwatching — a big plus for nature lovers!

To get here, find your way to Tai Po and take any public transportation that takes you through Ting Kok Road. Alight at Fung Yuen and begin your hike there. There is also a trail at Sha Lo Tung that that leads to the popular Pat Sin Leng Nature Trail.

Sha Lo Tung, Tai Po
23 Dec 2016

Sha Lo Tung, Tai Po

photo credit: Jason Yeo

Once home to Hakka farmers who have since moved to the city, Sha Lo Tung is by and large uninhabited, with the exception of village chief Cheung Wai-kok and his wife, who run a Hakka private kitchen very popular with weekend hikers. Though neglected and mostly crumbling, the abandoned homes make quite a stunning sight against the village’s backdrop of verdant greens. You see, the Sha Lo Tung wetlands are a protected ecological area, and a visit in spring and summer promises views of lush flora and fauna. The area is also a prime habitat for dragonflies, damselflies and butterflies, and is great for birdwatching — a big plus for nature lovers!

To get here, find your way to Tai Po and take any public transportation that takes you through Ting Kok Road. Alight at Fung Yuen and begin your hike there. There is also a trail at Sha Lo Tung that that leads to the popular Pat Sin Leng Nature Trail.

Ma Wan
23 Dec 2016

Ma Wan

photo credit: Jason Yeo

Since the government evicted its residents in 2011, the village of Ma Wan has been left to crumbling abandonment. In a nod to its heyday as a thriving fish farming village, shrimp paste-making farms lay hauntingly barren, along with dilapidated stilt houses by the water, weathered playgrounds and deserted homes complete with peeling paint and broken furniture. Many such buildings are boarded up with ‘No Trespassing’ signs, but there are several that you can freely access. Interestingly, the street lights still turn on in the evenings, but it still can get pretty creepy once night falls.

Ma Wan is accessible by bus from Tsing Ma MTR Station, or by boat from Central Ferry Pier 2. The village is located on Ma Wan Main Street.

Ma Wan
23 Dec 2016

Ma Wan

photo credit: Jason Yeo

Since the government evicted its residents in 2011, the village of Ma Wan has been left to crumbling abandonment. In a nod to its heyday as a thriving fish farming village, shrimp paste-making farms lay hauntingly barren, along with dilapidated stilt houses by the water, weathered playgrounds and deserted homes complete with peeling paint and broken furniture. Many such buildings are boarded up with ‘No Trespassing’ signs, but there are several that you can freely access. Interestingly, the street lights still turn on in the evenings, but it still can get pretty creepy once night falls.

Ma Wan is accessible by bus from Tsing Ma MTR Station, or by boat from Central Ferry Pier 2. The village is located on Ma Wan Main Street.

Ma Wan
23 Dec 2016

Ma Wan

photo credit: Jason Yeo

Since the government evicted its residents in 2011, the village of Ma Wan has been left to crumbling abandonment. In a nod to its heyday as a thriving fish farming village, shrimp paste-making farms lay hauntingly barren, along with dilapidated stilt houses by the water, weathered playgrounds and deserted homes complete with peeling paint and broken furniture. Many such buildings are boarded up with ‘No Trespassing’ signs, but there are several that you can freely access. Interestingly, the street lights still turn on in the evenings, but it still can get pretty creepy once night falls.

Ma Wan is accessible by bus from Tsing Ma MTR Station, or by boat from Central Ferry Pier 2. The village is located on Ma Wan Main Street.

 

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