10 underrated dishes to order at Chomp Chomp Food Centre

Come to this beloved hawker centre for the BBQ and stay for everything else

Photos: Jenny Tai
Photos: Jenny Tai
23 Mar 2018

Photos: Jenny Tai

There's a full house almost every night at Chomp Chomp Food Centre, where diners have to hunt for a free table amidst a ravenous crowd and the wafting fragrance of smoky barbecue, shrimp paste and wok hei. Many of us and our parents grew up eating supper at the landmark in Serangoon Gardens, where the tasty variety of affordable and authentic local eats can bring about a wave of nostalgia. It's comfort food at its best. There's something for everyone at Chomp Chomp -- and here are 10 of our top picks. 


Sambal sotong, sambal seafood fried rice, and kai lan from Fu BBQ Seafood (Stall 18)
Sambal sotong, sambal seafood fried rice, and kai lan from Fu BBQ Seafood (Stall 18)
23 Mar 2018

Sambal sotong, sambal seafood fried rice, and kai lan from Fu BBQ Seafood (Stall 18)

Stingray gets all the BBQ seafood glory at Chomp Chomp but sambal sotong ($10) packs a punch too. Sotong can be easily overcooked, but not here. Tossed in sambal, caramelised onions and belacan, the succulent squid rings and tentacles brim with flavour and are chewy with just enough bite. It's oily all right, so eat it with some rice -- or better yet, a plate of sambal seafood fried rice ($5), which we were delighted to find was less salty than expected. The portion is huge for its price, and it's a land mine of crab meat and baby shrimp. Stir-fried greens such as garlicky kai lan ($6) can be a welcome balance to all the sambal-rich foods. 

What makes them stand out: Hands down, it's the robust flavours. 


Lok lok from Wang BBQ and Grill (Stall 31)
Lok lok from Wang BBQ and Grill (Stall 31)
23 Mar 2018

Lok lok from Wang BBQ and Grill (Stall 31)

Satisfy your lok lok craving without travelling to Malaysia. Chomp Chomp's Wang BBQ and Grill offers a wide variety of marinated meat and vegetable skewers, generously seasoned. Among their more popular choices are grilled squid, bacon-wrapped asparagus, and an impressive selection of mushrooms (including bacon-wrapped enoki and shimeji, plus grilled button mushrooms, oyster mushrooms and shiitake). Our favourite was the pork belly skewer with three thick slabs of melt-in-your-mouth meat. Props for getting creative with combinations like fried wanton skin with bak kwa too. Service was a little slow, but we weren't disappointed. Price ranges from $1.20 to $3 per skewer. 

What makes it stand out: The three sauces (Thai sweet chili sauce, sesame sauce, and fiery spicy chilli sauce) add a whole 'nother layer to the already toothsome skewers. There's a nice vegetable selection that includes broccoli, long beans, baby pea sprouts, and okra wrapped in ham. 

Oyster Omelette at Ang Mo Kio 409 Fried Carrot Cake (Stall 24)
Oyster Omelette at Ang Mo Kio 409 Fried Carrot Cake (Stall 24)
23 Mar 2018

Oyster Omelette at Ang Mo Kio 409 Fried Carrot Cake (Stall 24)

Oyster-lovers, Ang Mo Kio 408 Carrot Cake has got you covered, serving up delicious eggy goodness loaded with fat, juicy oysters that explode in your mouth. There's a perfect blend of gooey fried egg with slightly crisp edges, paired with oozy oysters and a hint of brine -- all enhanced by fragrant chopped Chinese parsley. With tangy chilli sauce adding some zing, this dish definitely satisfied our taste buds. Oily? Yes, but you'll be too busy shovelling piping hot clumps of omelette in your mouth to care. Price ranges from $3 to $5. 

What makes it stand out: Generous fresh oysters aside, we like the omelette's full-bodied eggy taste because there isn't too much starch in the batter. 

Photo: Instagram/@hkfoodie_yum

Rojak at Chomp Chomp Rojak and Popiah (Stall 10)
Rojak at Chomp Chomp Rojak and Popiah (Stall 10)
23 Mar 2018

Rojak at Chomp Chomp Rojak and Popiah (Stall 10)

People might not venture to Chomp Chomp solely for the rojak ($3-5), but it's a great side dish that complements everything else that's more filling in your spread. Plus, it's one way to include antioxidant-rich fruits to your sinfully lavish meal. When it comes to rojak, it's all about the sauce, and this one is satisfyingly sweet, sour and spicy with notes of chilli shrimp paste, lime, and palm sugar -- with a blanket of crunchy ground peanuts.The stall also sells appetising hand rolled popiah ($4) and kueh pie tee ($3.50). 

What makes it stand out: It's one of the lighter options yet it's still chockfull of flavour. After ingesting a ton of fried, grilled, or barbecued food, it's nice to chomp on some raw fruits and vegetables. 

Photo: Instagram/@yv0vy

Sambal stingray from Hai Wei Yuan BBQ (Stall 1)
Sambal stingray from Hai Wei Yuan BBQ (Stall 1)
23 Mar 2018

Sambal stingray from Hai Wei Yuan BBQ (Stall 1)

No meal at Chomp Chomp would be complete without sambal stingray ($12). With excellent grilling technique, Hai Wei Yuan BBQ serves up fresh, tender stingray with smoky char-grilled edges. Lathered in spicy sambal and heaped with onion slices, the stingray tastes best when dipped in the tart chinchalok sauce (a special blend of lime, fermented small shrimps, onions and chilli). It's so shiok you won't even mind breaking out in buckets of sweat. Just don't sit near the stall, otherwise you'll be encased in BBQ smoke clouds. 

What makes it stand out: The freshness of the stingray and how juicy the meat is. 

Photo: Instagram/@ms_foodie_faith

Fried Hokkien Prawn Noodles from Chia Keng (Stall 2)
Fried Hokkien Prawn Noodles from Chia Keng (Stall 2)
23 Mar 2018

Fried Hokkien Prawn Noodles from Chia Keng (Stall 2)

That's right, we're skipping the famed Ah Hock Fried Hokkien Mee for this underdog. There's no disputing that Ah Hock's is a must-try, but instead of waiting over 30 minutes for a plate, why not give Cha Keng a shot? The fried hokkien prawn noodles ($3.50-5) are so deliciously shrimpy. It's got that shrimpy essence and aroma that gets you salivating before you even taste it. Amidst the juicy prawns and squid rings, each glossy strand of noodle is lathered in smooth, silky gravy that pairs best with their tastebud-searing spicy chilli sauce (a little goes a long way). Drizzle a bit of calamansi lime over it and tuck right in.

What makes it stand out: If you like wetter Hokkien mee, this is for you. Also, if you have any leftovers or want to da bao, rest assured that it's been proven to taste even better the day after (probably due to sitting longer in the gravy). 

Lime juice and sugar cane juice at Ding Hao (Stall 15)
Lime juice and sugar cane juice at Ding Hao (Stall 15)
23 Mar 2018

Lime juice and sugar cane juice at Ding Hao (Stall 15)

Ding Hao is known for their freshly squeezed sugar cane towers ($15) that could easily satiate the thirst of four to six people. But their best kept secret is actually their lime juice. We consider ourselves lime juice connoisseurs, so trust us when we say there is nothing more disappointing than taking a sip of something thinly veiled as "lime juice" when it's more like watered down artificial citrus syrup that bears more similarity to lemon dishwashing detergent. The lime juice at Ding Hao though, is a completely different story. The first sip knocked our tastebuds back with its extreme lime flavour. It tastes like handfuls of calamansi limes were distilled into one single cup, with the perfect sugar level and a hint of salted plum cutting through the sourness. 

What makes it stand out: The sheer size of the sugar cane cups and towers, and the 10/10 lime juice that acts as an ideal palate cleanser between bites of greasy food. The uncles and aunties here are alway friendly, which is definitely a plus. 

Satay bee hoon at Satay Bee Hoon and Hainan Beef Noodle (Stall 17)
Satay bee hoon at Satay Bee Hoon and Hainan Beef Noodle (Stall 17)
23 Mar 2018

Satay bee hoon at Satay Bee Hoon and Hainan Beef Noodle (Stall 17)

Drenched in satay peanut gravy and topped with chewy cuttlefish, prawn, pork and kang kong, this satay bee hoon is totally worth it at $5. The vermicelli and fried beancurd puff are quick to absorb the tasty sauce, laced with the distinct aroma and texture of ground peanuts. 

What makes it stand out: Because the dish was already so filling, we liked that the satay peanut gravy was flavourful without being too rich and overwhelming. 


Carrot cake (Stall 36)
Carrot cake (Stall 36)
24 Mar 2018

Carrot cake (Stall 36)

We weren't converts of white carrot cake until we ate it from this stall, affectionately known as the "stall with no name" by many Chomp Chomp regulars. Although it's touted for its black carrot cake ($3-5) doused with sweet dark sauce, consider going for the lighter white version instead. When your Chomp Chomp spread already consists of rich, heavy foods soaked in sauce (sambal, satay, etc.), a no-frills dish of white carrot cake balances things out. Soft and moist radish cubes are fried with beaten eggs to form a delicious, slightly charred crispy crust. For such a simple dish, this white carrot cake is packed with flavour. Don't forget the chilli.

What makes it stand out: How hearty it is even sans sauce. It's heavy on the garlic and umami saltiness from chai poh, and has an overall comforting taste. 

Photo: Instagram/@francispeh

Satay from Hong Sa Li Satay (Stall 32)
Satay from Hong Sa Li Satay (Stall 32)
23 Mar 2018

Satay from Hong Sa Li Satay (Stall 32)

The well-marinated chicken, mutton, and pork skewers (60 cents each) are thoroughly penetrated with flavour with a tinge of smokiness. We like that there isn't too much fat on the meat, which makes us feel marginally better about indulging in 15 skewers with rice (additional 60 cents). Ask for extra cucumbers for the refreshing raw veggie crunch in between all the toothsome meat. 

What makes it stand out: Their pineapple satay sauce, with a chunk of crushed pineapple plunked inside, is the bomb. 


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