8 instant noodles you have to try in Korea

It’s not just spicy noodles and red broths here in Korea

8 instant noodles you have to try in Korea
8 instant noodles you have to try in Korea
11 Mar 2019

8 instant noodles you have to try in Korea

From the mind-numbingly spicy Korean fire noodles, to the ever-comforting Shin Ramyun, Korean instant noodles have always been a hit with Singaporeans. But, sometimes, you just get a little tired of the same old brands and noodles that you see everywhere on the Little Red Dot. 

After all, variety is the spice of life, no? For all the true instant noodles aficionados out there, here are eight unique instant ramyeon that you just have to try in Korea.

Ottogi Mac & Cheese Spaghetti
Ottogi Mac & Cheese Spaghetti
11 Mar 2019

Ottogi Mac & Cheese Spaghetti

Price: 1,600 won (S$1.95)

These noodles require the use of a microwave oven to prepare, but we promise, it’s worth the extra step. The Ottogi Mac & Cheese Spaghetti bowl is deceptively named, with no sight of spaghetti noodles in the bowl. Instead, you get instant ramyeon noodles with a couple of spiral and elbow pasta thrown in for variety and bite. Although these noodles are meant to be eaten dry, there is no need to drain the water after cooking the noodles, so take note!

After adding the cheese powder and water, pop the bowl in the microwave for 3 and a half minutes, before adding in the rest of the cheese sauces (a total of three sachets). 

The sauce is surprisingly savoury and though the cheese taste is not that strong at first, it grows on you. Towards the end of the bowl, it gets a little too cheesy, though those who like their mac and cheese strong probably won’t complain. For fans of boxed mac and cheese (no judgement, we promise), this is for you.

Photos: Instagram/@sun_zuni, Toggle

CU’s Garlic & Butter Noodle
CU’s Garlic & Butter Noodle
11 Mar 2019

CU’s Garlic & Butter Noodle

Price: 1,600 won (S$1.95)

Sick of the honey butter trend that all but eclipsed everything back in 2015? Try its more savoury cousin, the garlic butter noodle on for size. This dry instant ramyeon may look unassuming when prepared, with barely any colour on it, but it more than makes up for its bland appearance with its flavour.

While there is not much garlic flavour to it, the noodles are chewy, and savoury, with a slight kick. We like to refer to it as the less-spicy cousin of Samyang Food’s Honey & Cheese Ramyeon. 

Paldo Kko Kko Myeon
Paldo Kko Kko Myeon
11 Mar 2019

Paldo Kko Kko Myeon

Price: 1,400 won (S$1.70) 

These noodles were an instant hit when they first came out in Korea, thanks to comedian Lee Kyung Kyu. Based on his own recipe, which he revealed on a televised competition for the best instant noodles, this is the instant chicken noodle soup to beat in Korea. 

Warm, comforting, with a strong chicken aroma, the Kko Kko Myeon is flavourful with a slight spice that perks it up. For those familiar with the oft-talked about Ke Kou Mian, we reckon this is the Korean alternative of it.

Photos: Paldo, KBS

Ottogi Jinjja Jjolmyeon
Ottogi Jinjja Jjolmyeon
11 Mar 2019

Ottogi Jinjja Jjolmyeon

Price: 1,400 won (S$1.70)

All the Korean fried chicken fans in the house, here’s your noodle alternative to the delightfully crispy and spicy-sweet yangnyum chicken. Yet another dry noodle to add to the list, the Ottogi Jinjja Jolmyeon noodles are perfectly chewy and bouncy, with a nice bite to it. They are coated in a thick red sauce that is more sweet, than spicy, just like yangnyum chicken.

The cherry on top? The ultra-cute mini egg slices that are included in the seasoning packets. For extra cheer and cuteness, we recommend steeping them in hot water separately to hydrate, before draining and sprinkling them on top of the mixed noodles.

Photos: Instagram/@ho_ong_i, Toggle

Ottogi Spaghetti Ramen
Ottogi Spaghetti Ramen
11 Mar 2019

Ottogi Spaghetti Ramen

Price: 1,000 won (S$1.20)

The Ottogi Spaghetti Ramen is essentially comfort food, akin to the tomato spaghetti you’d get from your favourite western food stall at a hawker center growing up. It’s nothing spectacular, but at the same time, there is something addictive about it.

The noodles are a little different from the typical instant ramyeon noodles, and pair well with the sauce. Slightly sweet, and heavy on the tomato flavour, this is one noodle that you’d be slurping up from start to end. There is not much in the way of extra garnishes or seasoning that comes with the noodles, and we’d say it’s basic, plain spaghetti done right.

Nongshim Instant Buckwheat Soba
Nongshim Instant Buckwheat Soba
11 Mar 2019

Nongshim Instant Buckwheat Soba

Price: 1,300 won (S$1.55)

If you are craving something a little different, try Nongshim’s Instant Buckwheat Soba noodles to freshen up your meals. The noodles take a little longer to cook as compared to regular instant noodles, but you’re rewarded with actual buckwheat soba noodles, so we’d say it’s well worth the wait.

The sauce is a simple Japanese soy dipping sauce, made interesting with the addition of wasabi in the dehydrated powder seasoning block that comes with the noodles. As a result, the sauce offers a slight kick, but nothing too strong for those who don’t take to wasabi well. The noodles are best served slightly cold, for a refreshing bite.

Ottogi Japchae
Ottogi Japchae
11 Mar 2019

Ottogi Japchae

Price: 1,480 won (S$1.78) 

Korean japchae, or mixed glass noodles, is a pretty common side dish or main dish, reminiscent of a comforting, home-cooked meal. Ottogi takes on the challenge with their instant version of the Korean noodle dish. Boasting a calorie count of only 225 kcal per serving, this is the instant noodle for all the weight-watchers out there. 

Despite it’s low calorie count, the Japchae noodles does not scrimp on flavour. As is expected of the glass noodles, they are chewy and delicious. The seasoning packet that comes with the noodles also features a variety of dehydrated vegetables like wood ear, cabbage and mushrooms, which give the dish texture and crunch.

Photos: Ottogi, Toggle

 

GS25’s Very Spicy Jjamppong
GS25’s Very Spicy Jjamppong
11 Mar 2019

GS25’s Very Spicy Jjamppong

Price: 1,500 won (S$1.80)

These noodles might not be able to hold a candle to Samyang’s Fire Noodles when it comes to spice, but they do live up to it’s ‘Very Spicy’ name. 

The spice is a slow burn, with a heat that lingers even after you finish your mouthful. The noodles are chewy and the soup is chock-full of seafood flavour, with a strong briny smell to boot. So, for those who aren’t fans of seafood, we’d advise you to steer away from these noodles, or perhaps crack open a window or two. 

The seasoning packet comes with dehydrated kimchi, that retains most of it’s crunch and signature flavour after hydration, making it a most delightful addition to the noodles.

Related: 
11 popular Korean snacks to buy in Seoul
How to eat like a local in Seoul

Report a problem